Sunday, February 15, 2015

Senator Markey report: Hackers can get into most "connected cars"

Virtually all “connected cars” on the road are vulnerable to hackers who could steal data or gain control of the vehicle, a report from a U.S. senator said Feb. 9.
The report prepared by the staff of Senator Ed Markey said the wireless connectivity and Internet access available on the vehicles opens up security gaps that could be exploited for malicious purposes.
The study found these security weaknesses in “nearly 100 percent of cars on the market” and noted that most automobile manufacturers were unaware of or unable to report on past hacking incidents.
The senator’s staff, which collected data from 16 major auto manufacturers, cited earlier studies on some vehicles which showed how hackers can get into the controls of some popular vehicles, causing them to suddenly accelerate, turn, de-activate brakes, activate the horn, control headlights, and modify the speedometer and gas gauge readings.

“These findings reveal that there is a clear lack of appropriate security measures to protect drivers against hackers who may be able to take control of a vehicle or against those who may wish to collect and use personal driver information,” the report said.
The report obtained responses from 16 major global manufacturers: BMW, Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, Honda, Hyundai, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Porsche, Subaru, Toyota, Volkswagen and Volvo.